DepEd ALS partners with DSWD for mobile PWD teaching

The first workshop of DSWD-AVRC staff and Dep Ed ALS held to leverage technical expertise and operations of the I Love PWD Project.

The first workshop of DSWD-AVRC staff and Dep Ed ALS held to leverage technical expertise and operations of the I Love PWD Project.

Inspired with the convergence strategy, DSWD and the DepEd Alternative Learning System (ALS) partnered to improve literacy of educable persons with disabilities (PWDs) through the ‘I Love PWD’ Project.

 I Love PWD stands for Interactive Learning Opportunities Via Education for Persons With Disability.

 DSWD–AVRC and DepED-ALS partnership is geared to empower the PWDs in developing desirable working knowledge, attitudes, values and skills that will enable them to cope with challenges in life through livelihood, literacy and health education programs

 With its unique strategy of door to door delivery system, the 35 trained mobile teachers conduct the learning sessions in the homes of the PWDs during their vacant hours without additional remuneration.

 I LOVE PWD Cares

 Modules are based on the 5 learning strands of ALS such as writing, communication, and numeracy  skills;  critical thinking and problem solving; moral recovery program,  among others.

 With these strands of learning, their KASHE (Knowledge, Attitude, Skills, Habits, Experience) are improved.

 According to Dr. Edwin Ferrer, the PWDs under this program have improved their self confidence, “hindi na sila natatakot sa ibang tao, gumaganda na ang kanilang learning condition (they are not afraid of other people anymore, their learning condition is also enhanced).”

 Moreover, the mobile teachers heard overwhelming appreciations from the learners,” may mga magbibigay din pala ng  pansin sa amin (there are still people who are able to give attention to us) ,” was one remarkable statement mentioned.

 I Love PWDs Program is essential in preparing the PWDs for higher learning in formal or non-formal institutions like the DSWD –Area 1 Vocational Rehabilitation Center (AVRC). This is true with the PWDs who have not gone to any formal school and wanted to be trained on various skills such as basic computer operation, canteen management, and massage therapy.

 Expanding, Helping More

 With stronger partnership with the Local Government Units, the Program is expected to expand in the years to come since this is found essential in helping the PWDs access their right to education and maximize their full potentials.

 For the mobile educators, the idea of helping and volunteerism does not end here, sharing the knowledge and sacrificing time, talents, and treasure will surely bring a change in the life of persons with disabilities. (by: Iryn D. Cubangbang, Regl. Information Officer)

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Region 1 Pag-asa Youth Association (PYA) Shines

Mr.Alvin Corleto of Pangasinan Chapter and Ms. Lizette Asilo of Urdaneta Chapter were crowned as PYAP Ambassador/Ambassadress 2013.

Mr.Alvin Corleto of Pangasinan Chapter and Ms. Lizette Asilo of Urdaneta Chapter were crowned as PYAP Ambassador/Ambassadress 2013.

130 Youth Leaders/Members of the Pag-Asa Youth Association (PYA) from the four provinces and eight cities in the region (except for Batac City) joined the Regional Pag- Asa Youth Association of the Philippines (RPYAP) Summit cum Post Celebration of the PYAP Foundation Day held at Nueva Segovia Consortium of Cooperatives (NSCC) Located in Caoayan, Ilocos Sur, recently.

 Aside from friendship, camaraderie and sportsmanship this activity facilitated better coordination among the PYAP Federations in the Region.

 Newly elected PYAP Federated  President Richard Dizon leads the new batch of  officers for CY 2013-2015. Others include Vice President, Peter Jay Pascua; Secretary, Jeric Estioco; Treasurer, Cherry Gil Taylan; Business Manager, Jonathan Cortez; and Auditor, Marlon Ragandap.

 The Forum on the other hand, heightened the social consciousness of the youth on  emerging issues affecting the youth sector such  protecting the environment and community participation.

 Mr. Celso Jucutan of LINK (Lupon ng mga Individual na Nangangalaga ng Kalikasan) promoted activities towards environmental preservation where  5 areas of committees are implemented: Blue- Marine Conservation; Green-Reforestation; Brown-Solid Waste Management; White- Air Conservation; and Red-Disaster Management.

 Mr. Jucutan motivated the youth to actively participate to this endeavor and to closely coordinate with LINK for any environmental activities to save Mother Earth.

 PYAP Talks Success

 Richard Dizon ( RPYAP President)  and Jeric Estioco (RPYAP Secretary) gained high self esteem and have overcome shyness while doing activities for the PYAP. They became  active as  DCC/DCW accrediter, worked for the Government Internship Program (GIP), Immersion Outreach Program (IOP), PYAP Mobilization Thru Cash-for Work and the DSWD-TESDA Cash for Training Program.

 Other successful members include Melvin Libunao a former PYAP member now  kagawad in Brgy. Paras, Candon City; while Anna Arquero a former PYA President was hired as Job Order at the CSWDO-  San Fernando City. ### (by: Iryn D. Cubangbang, Information Officer II)

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Miramar’s ‘Binungey’

binungey

In Bolinao, Pangasinan, the famous ‘binungey’ (available only here)  sold at 3 pieces for Php 100.00, played a big part in sustaining the family of  Miramar Orlanda, a Pantawid Pamilya beneficiary.

 Made of ‘malagkit’ and coconut milk placed inside cut bamboo poles and  steamed for an hour, the ‘binungey’  helped her family survive in the  last 30 years. They tried to live the simplest ways with her 8 children  and now 3 grand children. It also enabled them  to  improve their partially concreted house.

 In 2008, the coming of the Pantawid Pamilya Program was a great relief, the  Php 2,800.00 cash grant  in 2  months, helped provide vitamins and nutritious  food to the family particularly the children.

 Two years ago, with DSWD’s capital assistance amounting to Php 5,000.00, the ‘binungey’ products was enhanced as to taste and shelf-life in order to entice more customers.

 With her husband, the 3-hour processing of ‘binungey’ is not at all very tasking. They usually cook at night and starts with  the ‘malagkit’, cleaning of cut bamboo poles, and steaming  the combined coconut milk and ‘malagkit’.

 Services Extended

 An average income of Php 2,000.00  a month is earned by the family during peak months of ‘binungey’ starting on the months of November to April. They sell at most 4 times a week in front of the Roman Catholic Church for the tourists visiting in the area.

 As mentioned, Miramar’s love and concern for other is felt by neighbours who talk about her being selfless.  At all times she encourages her neighbour to sell ‘binungey’ products which help augment school allowance of their children.

 Accordingly, enough school allowance is very important to shield children from being bullied and experience low self esteem.

 Poor’s access to basic rights

 Miramar is belittled by well-off neighbours  in many ways because of being poor and not being  educated, but through the Family Development Sessions, she was taught of her basic rights. ‘Diak  kayat iti mauy-uyaw, adda karapata’k a marigrigat,” (I don’t want to be vilified, I have my rights although I am poor) she exclaimed in vernacular. With series of sessions, she learned the importance of education  and keeping the family together. ### (by: Iryn D. Cubangbang, IO II)

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SLP PARTNERS PLEDGE FULL COMMITMENT AND SUPPORT

Being trusted SLP partners, they swear to give their full support to all the program’s thrusts.

Being trusted SLP partners, they swear to give their full support to all the program’s thrusts.

In a unified voice, all active and prospective partners in the implementation of Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP) verbally pledged their commitment and support of their organization in realizing all the thrusts of the program in bringing about development to the lives of Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program beneficiaries.

 The SLP is being spearheaded by the Department of Social Welfare and Development Field Office 1 (DSWD FO1).

 Representatives from Non-Government Agencies (NGAs), Civil Society Organizations (CSOs), Private Sectors, and Cooperatives were convened in the second SLP Partnership Forum together with selected Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries to strengthen the implementation of existing convergence initiatives and expand to additional areas of cooperation.

 Their collaboration with DSWD got more intense and strengthened as they were being recognized as valued partners in the effective and efficient implementation of the department’s core programs through convergence strategy.

 Thus, underscored by the Regional CSO Focal Person Leah Mylen Lucero while articulating the roles of CSOs as Bantay, Gabay, Tulay, and Kaagapay.

 And they proved that they are worthy of their recognition through presenting the present status, challenges, lessons, and recommendations as their contribution in SLP implementation.

 Most of the partners were glad to know that the clients they are serving before they entered into a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with DSWD are also beneficiaries of the Pantawid Pamilya. That makes them more inspired to give better services to their clients through their partnership with SLP.

 “We are looking forward for a good partnership. We are willing to share our time, talent, and expertise for the beneficiaries of the Pantawid Pamilya”, Adelia C. Navarro, United Primary Cooperative (UNIPRIMCO) Manager said.

 Such commitment was heard directly by selected beneficiaries of Pantawid Pamilya. That is why Natalia Cedron, President of Santiago Island SEA-K Workers Association of Bolinao (SISWAB) in Bolinao, Pangasinan promised to utilize and maximize well the capital assistance provided by DSWD to their organization.

 Other beneficiaries extended also their heartfelt thanks to DSWD for providing them livelihood through SLP. According to Marcelina Sesuca from Cabugao, Ilocos Sur, it is a blessing that her family was included Pantawid Pamilya beneficiary and her husband worked at the Trabahong Lansangan of the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH).

 The SLP Regional Project Coordinator Agnes Tambalo hopes for more from the strengthened partnership. She mentioned that support and commitment of all the partners are vital in pursuit to inclusive development. And she also looks forward for expansion of commitment or areas of engagement to those existing SLP partners.

By Jaesem Ryan A. Gaces, Administrative Assistant V, Listahanan/NHTS-PR

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Tacloban relief operations: tough but focused

The 5-day travel along with convoy of 19 buses and trucks seem endless but incomparable to the eerie sadness and pain each one felt upon seeing the devastated Samar and Leyte provinces particularly Tacloban City.

Thus, was shared by Social Worker Clarivel Banzuela who experienced 11 days of deployment to DSWD National Relief Operations Center  (NROC) and in delivering goods to Tacloban City.

As mentioned, upon seeing the total wrecked communities, only silent sighs and deep upset consumed her. “There is a lot of work to do. Houses and buildings seemed stirred and pulverized by a hammer. Survivors were left with nothing,”  Banzuela mentioned.

As observed, relief operations in Tacloban City is systematic. The hauling and distribution of goods are tough but every worker is focused on their assigned tasks, she continued. Coordination with the Local Officials on relief distribution is done even up to the  barangay level.

As said, the Social Workers cannot get away from conducting counseling activities, whenever they get in touch with the victims who are still in trauma and fear.

One survivor said, “nakakaiyak yung nangyari na nawalan kami ng ari-arian at mahal sa buhay pero mas nakakaiyak ngayon na makita galing pa sa iba’t ibang lugar ang tumutulong sa amin (we can’t help but cry because we lost our properties and love ones but it is more hurting that people from other places are here to  help us).

Upon return to Manila, about 508 survivors went along and were dropped off to Villamor Airbase for temporary shelter and debriefing sessions.

Moreover, Regional Director ‘Jun’ Castillo together with other regional directors  alternately supervise  the NROC together with other line agencies. (by: Iryn D. Cubangbang, Information Officer II)

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Tacloban relief operations: tough but focused

A survivor of Typhoon Yolanda who just received a sack of relief goods. On his back are fellow survivors awaiting for their relief.

A survivor of Typhoon Yolanda who just received a sack of relief goods. On his back are fellow survivors awaiting for their relief.

The 5-day travel along with convoy of 19 buses and trucks seem endless but incomparable to the eerie sadness and pain each one felt upon seeing the devastated Samar and Leyte provinces particularly Tacloban City.

Thus, was shared by Social Worker Clarivel Banzuela who experienced 11 days of deployment to DSWD National Relief Operations Center  (NROC) and in delivering goods to Tacloban City.

As mentioned, upon seeing the total wrecked communities, only silent sighs and deep upset consumed her. “There is a lot of work to do. Houses and buildings seemed stirred and pulverized by a hammer. Survivors were left with nothing,”  Banzuela mentioned.

As observed, relief operations in Tacloban City is systematic. The hauling and distribution of goods are tough but every worker is focused on their assigned tasks, she continued. Coordination with the Local Officials on relief distribution is done even up to the  barangay level.

As said, the Social Workers cannot get away from conducting counseling activities, whenever they get in touch with the victims who are still in trauma and fear.

One survivor said, “nakakaiyak yung nangyari na nawalan kami ng ari-arian at mahal sa buhay pero mas nakakaiyak ngayon na makita galing pa sa iba’t ibang lugar ang tumutulong sa amin (we can’t help but cry because we lost our properties and love ones but it is more hurting that people from other places are here to  help us).

Upon return to Manila, about 508 survivors went along and were dropped off to Villamor Airbase for temporary shelter and debriefing sessions.

Moreover, Regional Director ‘Jun’ Castillo together with other regional directors  alternately supervise  the NROC together with other line agencies. (by: Iryn D. Cubangbang, Information Officer II)

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Feels Good at 97

Lola Fe Lausan of Santa Cruz, Ilocos Sur, a social pensioner.

Lola Fe Lausan of Santa Cruz, Ilocos Sur, a social pensioner.

Despite her old age and inability to take care of her self, Lola Fe is known for her clean and fresh smell at the age of 97. She is wearing an aura of calmness that makes her often visited and appreciated in her community in Santa Cruz, Ilocos Sur.

Born on February 5, 1916, the radiance displayed in her pale and sagging face make  Lola Fe Lausan the ‘wonder Lola’ as described by the youngsters in the community.  Oftentimes, her daughter Lolita is asked how she lived during her younger days because of her long life.

Lola Fe is considered among the extraordinary elderly in  Santa Cruz, Ilocos Sur and also  among the focus of help by the Local Government Unit, said Head Social Worker Saturnina Hernandez.

Considering Lola Fe’s age, good health is already an accomplishment for  her daughter Lolita Angubil, who is among her 11 children. Engaging Lola Fe to take a bath  is not easy, as she has to be placed in a laundry basin and sitted  in the middle while being washed.

She is likened to a toddler, related Lolita. Kasla ubing nga alagaak, ngem maragsakanak a mangaramid kaniana dagitoy ta mananam na met panagayatko. Idi inyanak nak sinaksaklot nak ita isu met saklutek.   (Mother  is now like a toddler being cared  for, but I am happy  showing her my love. When I was young, she held me in her lap, now I am the one doing it to  her ),” said Lolita

With proper care and good nutrition (mostly vegetable viands), Lola Fe is still healthy at 97. “Nasayaat pay iti salun-at na, daydiay laeng kinabaket na,” (She is in good condition, it is only her old-age that makes her vulnerable), said Lolita.

More importantly, Lola Fe is cherished in the family. ‘Uray marigrigatan kami ket haan mi kayat isuna a matay pay (Even if sometimes burdened, we do not want her to die yet).  Lola Fe’s grand children enjoy listening to her soft voice relating stories  and giving advice  such as to be good always saying, ‘agsingsingpet  kayo,’ in vernacular, said 8-year old great granddaughter, Jessica  Angloben. In return, her grandchildren take time to play with her by gently scratching her back while Lola Fe prays her rosary.

Stipend, an add on

There are many things to be thankful for, but Lolita is more grateful for  the governments help such as the stipend she receives every three months from the DSWD’s Social Pension Program, “Maragsakan daytoy riknak ta adda para ken nanang”  (I feel elated because   my mother gets something).

“Agyaman kami iti gobierno ta nairaman ni nanang, addan igatang para iti meryenda ken kanenna,” (We thank our government for making my mother a part of their program. Now, she has money to buy for her food).

“Iyan anay mi daytoy a gatad para ken Nanang, napia ta adda ited ti gobierno a kastoy (We make both ends meet for the stipend of my mother, at least the government provides such).

Accordingly, the stipend makes Lola Fe’s and her daughter’s   life easier especially  that they have  no stable source of income.

In the municipal level, Mayor Teresita Valle extend financial assistance to needy  senior citizens.  (by: Iryn D. Cubangbang, Information Officer II)

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DSWD FO1 Gets CSC Level II Accreditation

CSC Director Violeta N. Mendoza during the awarding of the certificate of accreditation to DSWD through   Dir. Marcelo Nicomedes  J. Castillo

CSC Director Violeta N. Mendoza during the awarding of the certificate of accreditation to DSWD through Dir. Marcelo Nicomedes J. Castillo

In pursuit of  excellence in Human Resource and Organization Development, DSWD passed the Level II Accreditted Status by the Civil Service Commission, where the former received its accreditation certificate recently.

 With a rating of 90%, DSWD Field Office 1 continues to have a  competent Human Resource Management and compliant with the requirements, said  CSC Director Violeta N. Mendoza.

 Thru this, DSWD speeds up its  hiring and recruitment processes with the bulk of appointments done regularly for its poverty reduction programs. Final action on appointments are done by the appointing authority in accordance with  Civil Service Law, rules, and regulations. This  covers all appointments issued by the appointing authority.

 This program is under the Civil Service Program to Institutionalize Meritocracy and Excellence in Human Resource Management (PRIME-HRM) that capacitates national agencies in their Human Resource Management functions.

 In response, DSWD Director Marcelo NIcomedes J. Castillo  posed a challenge to continue with the good performance in hiring, managing and developing people to be responsive players in social protection programs and to always practice its mantra of ‘mahusay,’ ‘matapat,’ at magiliw na paglilingkod sa sambayanan.  (by: Iryn D. Cubangbang, Information Officer II)

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