Bolinao ‘Danggit Producers’: DSWD’s Model Peoples’ Organization

SISWAB

A SISWAB member on its ‘danggit’ drying activity.

A group of ‘danggit’ makers named SISWAB  was hailed recently as DSWD’s best peoples’ organization. With a plaque and cash prize of Php 25,000.00, this Panata Ko sa Bayan Award under Gawad Paglilingkod  sa Sambayanan (GAPAS) was given during DSWD’s 63rd Anniversary celebration held at Central Office, Quezon City graced by His Excellency President Benigno Aquino III.

 Dubbed as SISWAB or Santiago Island SEA-K Workers’ Association of Bolinao, this organization is composed of 108 enterprising women from 20 SEA-K associations in the island barangay of Bolinao whose main livelihood is ‘Danggit Making.’

‘Danggit’ is dried fish using the ‘Barangen’ variety, the raw material is very abundant in Santiago Island. The production  has become a family enterprise to many in this island.

At first, improving the ‘Danggit’ Processing and establishing a Trading Center was only a concept and a ‘wish list’ among these producers.

Now, this is slowly being realized because of DSWD’s convergence strategy and Community Driven Enterprise Development (CDED) Program. Regional line agencies’ concerted efforts has become tangible particularly with the DOLE, BFAR in coordination with the LGU of Bolinao, Barangay Council, among others.

With the enhanced ‘Danggit Processing,’ the SISWAB members buy the ‘Barangen’ fish from its members for processing, packaging and selling to customers and prospective market outlets at a standard cost. To accommodate bigger demands, the DOLE-assisted Project Drying Machine shall be of  great help in attaining improved quality and higher production of ‘danggit.’

The project started with the capital share of SISWAB amounting to P50,000.00 (provided by the DSWD) and LGU-Bolinao counterpart worth Php110,000.00. The Drying Machine from DOLE had been approved with the total cost of  Php 424,400.00.

As mentioned by SISWAB members, they are not only considering the improved ‘danggit’ production as a source of income but this will also give more employment and tourism opportunities  since the help of DOT, BFAR and DTI were also tapped.  (by: Iryn D. Cubangbang, Regl. Information Officer)

Posted in newsComments (0)

DSWD assists 59 human trafficking cases in Region 1

Adapted photo from internet.

Adapted photo from internet.

Illegal recruitment is just among the acts that leads to human trafficking. With 59 cases served recently, the DSWD provided psychosocial interventions, livelihood/financial assistance and repatriation.

 Thus, was revealed by Focal Person Tess Emock  of DSWD Field Office 1.

 Human trafficking happens in the locality and even across borders. In Region 1, most of the cases served by DSWD are individuals recruited or transported from across regions or even across countries who ended up in forced labor or prostitution. The victims were  promised with a decent job but ended up exploited, Emock further said.

 Means of human trafficking include force, threat, abduction, fraud, abuse of power or position to engage the victims to exploitation, prostitution, slavery, sale of organ and children in armed conflict as stipulated in Republic Act 9208.

 With the intensified program for victims of human trafficking,  such as the Recovery  and Reintegration  Program for  Trafficked Persons (RRPTP), tangible services were provided and more victims were encouraged to come to the open/ report.

 Management of cases of trafficking starts from the rescue to repatriation and provision of financial assistance. For CY 2013, DSWD assisted 14 children-victims from various regions and 45 cases served came from other countries, wherein highest number was trafficked in Malaysia (14).

 Further, qualified trafficking where penalty is higher (imprisonment and maximum of Php 5M penalty), it includes when children are the victims, when the victim dies, or when the perpetrator is a government official or member of the law enforcement.

 Relatively, the established Regional Inter-Agency Committee Against Trafficking (RIACAT) helps address effectively the concerns of trafficking  victims  particularly on their recovery and holistic services.  (by: Iryn D. Cubangbang, Regl. Information Officer)

Posted in newsComments (0)

DSWD locates CCT beneficiary – Yolanda survivors

DSWD is calling all Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries affected by super typhoon Yolanda, particularly those who transferred in Region 1, to update their status and other information as program claimholders. This is to ensure that they will still receive their cash grants due to them.

With Yolanda’s devastation, beneficiaries’ documents were washed out and many may have transferred residence to unaffected areas.

For temporary transfer, beneficiaries must decide when will be their plan to return to their original addresses. Staying longer in the area would mean decrease of cash grants as they cannot comply with the set program conditions in their previous location. Without processing the change of address, it may possibly mean termination from Pantawid Pamilya.

On the other hand, permanent transfer must undergo the regular process and procedures of/in change address.

DSWD encourages typhoon Yolanda affected beneficiaries to visit their City/Municipal Social Welfare and Development Offices (C/MSWDOs) and look for their City/Municipal Links (C/MLs) in the area they are currently residing.

Pantawid Pamilya is a conditional cash transfer program of the Philippine government which invests in human capital through health and education by providing cash grants to extremely poor households with children ages 0 – 14 years old.

by: Allan O. Lulu / Information Officer II, Pantawid Pamilya

Posted in newsComments (0)

Rehabilitative Activities Set on CICL

Selected CICL on their massage training.

Selected CICL on their massage training.

With 134 residents for the previous year, facilitating a speedy rehabilitation, to avoid congestion of CICL (Children in Conflict with the Law) in the center is among the focus of DSWD- Regional Rehabilitation Center for Youth ( RRCY).

 As reported, 57 CICL were discharged last year with the focused case management and efficient social services and support of the Local Government Units, Judicial Courts, families, and communities.

 For the previous 3 months, several trainings equipped the CICL skills that are helpful when they go back to their communities such as Hair Cutting and Swedish and Zhiatsu Massage Therapy held with 50 CICL. Also, Computer Literacy Training provided an opportunity for additional learning particularly those who want to pursue their college degree and / or acquire additional credential for future employment.

 Reward System in the Center is seen as among the effective techniques in redirecting their behaviour, said Center Head Bella B. Ferrer.

 Likewise, the case conference / rehabilitation team meeting enables a faster identification of areas needing intensive interventions.

 More external partners are sharing their resources such as the Bacnotan Senior Citizens Association led by Mr. Expedito Pilar who spearheaded a Goat Raising Project  for the CICL.

 Valued partners such as Don Eulogio De Guzman Memorial Natl. High Shool,  Phil. Natl. Police- Region 1 and  University of Cordilleras also held special gift-giving and fun game activities with the CICL   to celebrate the past yuletide season

 Further, the Commission on Human Rights held a dialogue in RRCY to promote  CICL awareness on their rights as well as responsibilities stipulated in the Convention on the Rights of A Child. Some 6 CICL were also baptized under the Roman Catholic rites prior to the holiday season. (by: Iryn D. Cubangbang, Regl. Information Officer)

Posted in newsComments (0)

Passion for fellow IPs

Forty two-year old Elvira Agsaullo, a mother of five is among the Pantawid Pamilya Parent Leaders being praised for her passion and dedication to her co-beneficiaries in a Kankanaey tribe of Nagyubuyuban, City of San Fernando, La Union.

 Pursuing education the hard way

Waking up at 4:00 AM, Elvira’s children start to prepare for school. With patience and perseverance, the children endure the 1 1/2 hour walk passing through large creeks and mountain slopes. They untiringly attend classes because they are dreaming of a better life.

Finishing high school, Elvira has no other dreams than seeing her children finish their studies to have a different fate.

Seasonally, their income comes from planting taro and by regularly producing soft brooms earning P600/week from 60 pieces made. Their cash grants helped the family provide the children’s necessities particularly school needs, fees and improved food intake.

In the olden days, people in the area does not give much importance to education. They can live without it, but now they are encouraging the youth to study.

Now, they have appreciated its value for their children’s future. Thus, education, is the only treasure Elvira can give to her children.

 FDS learnings

In the conduct of Family Development Sessions (FDS), Elvira said that she learned a lot of information and new learnings shared to her family. Some of these are on disaster preparedness, family’s health needs, parents’ roles and children’s rights.

Because of the FDS, the family learned to practice eating dinner together, an activity they seldom do, eventually making it an avenue for family bonding. More importantly, Elvira became more confident in dealing with people as she has also observed with majority of her co-beneficiaries.

Being one of the area’s Parent Leaders, Elvira said that one must have to extend her patience in understanding her co members. Some of the beneficiaries are hard to deal with however Elvira said that “siyak ti tinalek da isu nga anus lang” (They trusted me. I need to extend my patience for them. ). According to Elvira, it is patience and respect for others along with love in what you do that makes her continue.

She noticed that the FDS and her efforts are bearing good results. Most of her co – beneficiaries became active in participating in the sessions. They had improved confidence in blending with people including the improvement in wearing clothes and maintaining good hygiene. These are complete opposite of who they are before the coming of Pantawid Pamilya.

Naturally hard-working, people in the area does not prioritize socializing however with the FDS they are now given the confidence and opportunity to meet and mingle with people.

Responsible Leader

Even without financial remuneration, Elvira considers the cash grants as her incentive in doing PL works. She said, “Narigat ti ag  PL, sika ti bantay ngem naragsak ti makatulong .” (Being a Parent Leader is challenging. You’ll look after them however helping them is a fulfillment.

Elvira was even lured to run for a Barangay post however she declined saying that she can still help others without running for public office.

On the other hand, Elvira enjoys the responsibility because she is able to interact with everyone. An opportunity she is not previously used of.

After five years, Elvira hopes that they will no longer be in their current poverty situation. Instead she expects an improved way of life through their continuous practice on the learned positive activities brought about by the program.

by: Allan O. Lulu / Information Officer II, Pantawid Pamilya

Posted in newsComments (0)

Last Chance

Daniel Lang-es from City of San Fernando, La Union strives hard to have a better future with the support of DSWDs SGPPA

Daniel Lang-es from City of San Fernando, La Union strives hard to have a better future with the support of DSWDs SGPPA

Continuing a dream hindered by poverty, Daniel Lang – es of Narra Oeste, City of San Fernando, La Union is pursuing his studies after stopping for seven years. Thanks to the government’s scholarship program, the Student Grants in Aide Program for Poverty Alleviation (SGPPA).

Twenty six – year old Daniel is on his second year taking up Bachelor of Science in Industrial Education. Daniel strives to finish his studies in order to find a better job than being a Security Guard at a Cement Warehouse in the City. Accordingly, he manages his time by attending classes after his 7:00 AM – 7:00 PM guard duty.

Though challenged by nightly shifts, Daniel is still grateful for the job and his considerate employer. An employer who allows him to catch up for rest at dawn in time for his morning classes. Accordingly, his current job is better than previous ones being a construction worker taking home P170 after a hard day’s work and a house boy  receiving only P100 a day.

Separated with his wife, Daniel is inspired by his one year old daughter to finish school saying  “..tapno nasay sayaat ti masakbayan jay ubing ken haan na marikna jay rigat nga dinalanak. Uray kasatnu ti rigat basta para jay ubing” (for my daughter to have a better future and for her to avoid experiencing what I have gone through).

Daniel receives P 3,500 per month for allowance; P2,500 for book fees and P10,000 for tuition fees from SGPPA.

With his school allowances provided by the program, Daniel still manages to save a little for his daughter who stays with his in laws.

After five years, Daniel sees himself as a teacher helping children reach for their dreams. In order to achieve this, Daniel is putting his best in studying to maintain good grades.

Thankful to the Lord above, Daniel treats the scholarship as his last chance to pursue his dreams. Also, he hopes that the program will be able to help people like him who are very willing to study yet lacks opportunity and stopped by poverty.

by: Allan O. Lulu / Information Officer II, Pantawid Pamilya

Posted in newsComments (0)

Young Idol

Caila being interviewed during the Regional validation for the Search for Exemplary Pantawid Pamilya 2013

Caila being interviewed during the Regional validation for the Search for Exemplary Pantawid Pamilya 2013

Despite life’s challenges and imperfect family, Caila stays strong focusing more on studying hard and finding the love of a father through her loving uncles.

Born on March 5, 2002, Caila and her twin brother were taught to be God fearing, respectful to the elders and learn to value education. Despite the situation, Caila fully understood the family’s situation.

Grade six pupil Caila is a consistent Top performing pupil in school from Grade 1 to present and a very good student leader of Bani Elementary School. Dreaming to become a Civil Engineer someday, Caila is actively involved both in academic and extra-curricular activities. A stand out name and a proud representative in various competitions such as Quiz Bees, sports (badminton, chess and volleyball) bringing recognition to her school. With these qualities, Caila topped the regional search making her the region’s representative in the national Search for Exemplary Pantawid Pamilya 2013.

Helping her classmates out, Caila also facilitates “peer teaching” during her vacant period with her classmates who are hard up in class.

Together with her mother and twin brother, Caila is very active in their community’s “Coastal Clean-up Drive”  being held every 14th day of the month.

At home, she also helps perform some home activities such as washing the dishes, helps in gardening; getting firewood and do the laundry of her own clothes during Saturdays.

Caila Jean Munar receiving her 6th place award in the National Search for Exemplary Pantawid Pamilya 2013 held in PICC.

Caila Jean Munar receiving her 6th place award in the National Search for Exemplary Pantawid Pamilya 2013 held in PICC.

Part of a religious family, Caila joins in the family’s nightly routine of praying the Holy Rosary; going to mass every Sunday and attending Bible classes during summer. With this, Caila believed that “Kung walang Diyos, wala din tayo sa mundong ito.”

As a beneficiary, Caila mentioned that “umangat ng kaunti ang buhay namin” since they were able to buy their school needs through the cash grants being provided. She was also familiar with the program conditions saying “dapat sundin ang mga kondisyon ng programa.

Representing Region 1 in the national search, Caila showcased her talent in declamation with her piece “Let this Angel Live” tackling the agony of unborn children.

Ended on 6th place nationwide, Caila becomes one of the children advocates and ambassadors of Pantawid Pamilya who will advocate the positive changes the program has brought into their lives. Likewise, she is now being eyed as the region’s child advocate in the Regional Council for the Welfare of Children (RCWC).

Caila JeanDespite the fact that Caila’s father left, she still have the love and respect wishing him to come home and stop working once she finished her studies and turn to give back.

Asked for a wish, Caila hoped for a scholarship for her and her twin brother in order to realize their dreams.

Caila’s optimism, confidence, hard work, and faith are her own recipe of success in transforming their poverty stricken lives into a better future.

Pantawid Pamilya is a conditional cash transfer program of the Philippine government which invests in human capital through health and education by providing cash grants to extremely poor households with children ages 0 – 14 years old.

Posted in featuredComments (0)

Young Idol

Caila being interviewed during the Regional validation for the Search for Exemplary Pantawid Pamilya 2013

Caila being interviewed during the Regional validation for the Search for Exemplary Pantawid Pamilya 2013

Despite life’s challenges and imperfect family, Caila stays strong focusing more on studying hard and finding the love of a father through her loving uncles.

Born on March 5, 2002, Caila and her twin brother were taught to be God fearing, respectful to the elders and learn to value education. Despite the situation, Caila fully understood the family’s situation.

Grade six pupil Caila is a consistent Top performing pupil in school from Grade 1 to present and a very good student leader of Bani Elementary School. Dreaming to become a Civil Engineer someday, Caila is actively involved both in academic and extra-curricular activities. A stand out name and a proud representative in various competitions such as Quiz Bees, sports (badminton, chess and volleyball) bringing recognition to her school. With these qualities, Caila topped the regional search making her the region’s representative in the national Search for Exemplary Pantawid Pamilya 2013.

Helping her classmates out, Caila also facilitates “peer teaching” during her vacant period with her classmates who are hard up in class.

Together with her mother and twin brother, Caila is very active in their community’s “Coastal Clean-up Drive”  being held every 14th day of the month.

At home, she also helps perform some home activities such as washing the dishes, helps in gardening; getting firewood and do the laundry of her own clothes during Saturdays.

Caila Jean Munar receiving her 6th place award in the National Search for Exemplary Pantawid Pamilya 2013 held in PICC.

Caila Jean Munar receiving her 6th place award in the National Search for Exemplary Pantawid Pamilya 2013 held in PICC.

Part of a religious family, Caila joins in the family’s nightly routine of praying the Holy Rosary; going to mass every Sunday and attending Bible classes during summer. With this, Caila believed that “Kung walang Diyos, wala din tayo sa mundong ito.”

As a beneficiary, Caila mentioned that “umangat ng kaunti ang buhay namin” since they were able to buy their school needs through the cash grants being provided. She was also familiar with the program conditions saying “dapat sundin ang mga kondisyon ng programa.”

Representing Region 1 in the national search, Caila showcased her talent in declamation with her piece “Let this Angel Live” tackling the agony of unborn children.

Ended on 6th place nationwide, Caila becomes one of the children advocates and ambassadors of Pantawid Pamilya who will advocate the positive changes the program has brought into their lives. Likewise, she is now being eyed as the region’s child advocate in the Regional Council for the Welfare of Children (RCWC).

Caila JeanDespite the fact that Caila’s father left, she still have the love and respect wishing him to come home and stop working once she finished her studies and turn to give back.

Asked for a wish, Caila hoped for a scholarship for her and her twin brother in order to realize their dreams.

Caila’s optimism, confidence, hard work, and faith are her own recipe of success in transforming their poverty stricken lives into a better future.

Pantawid Pamilya is a conditional cash transfer program of the Philippine government which invests in human capital through health and education by providing cash grants to extremely poor households with children ages 0 – 14 years old.

by: Allan O. Lulu / Information Officer II, Pantawid Pamilya

Posted in newsComments (0)

Leadership Brand

Archives

Related Sites

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