DSWD resolves COA findings on Pantawid Pamilya, maintains auditors only seeking documentation

Responding to news articles citing the findings of the 2013 Annual Audit Report of the Commission on Audit (COA) on Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program being implemented by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said that answers and clarifications to the audit observations have already been submitted to the state auditing firm.

Sec. Soliman emphasized that the auditors were merely seeking documentation of program implementation and did not indicate any suspicion of misuse or misappropriation of funds.

“We are confident that there is nothing to doubt about the Department’s integrity, especially with the funds that COA cites as unliquidated in their 2013 annual audit report. The funds went to the rightful beneficiaries,” Sec. Soliman added.

The news articles reported that out of the P10.626 billion funds transferred by the DSWD to the Land Bank of the Philippines for the payment of Pantawid Pamilya cash grants for 2013, only P10.295 billion was utilized or disbursed as of Dec. 31, 2013, leaving behind a balance of P330.347 million representing unpaid amount intended for beneficiaries in eight regions. Some P91.929 million of which were unclaimed grants of active beneficiaries in Regions IV-A, VI, IX, and CARAGA.

“The DSWD is currently working on the liquidation of the whole amount. In fact we have already liquidated 94% of the 2013 funds for cash grants. Further, the Department is processing the return of cash grants intended for families/ households who were tagged by our system as delisted, with reflected status as missing, no eligible member for monitoring, or moved to areas not covered by the program,” Sec. Soliman explained.

Likewise, the news already the COA finding of 4,032 double household entries.

The Department has responded and said that 1,752 of which are unique households and were retained in the programs, while only 609 are actual duplicates and were delisted. The remaining 1,636 remaining entries are still undergoing validation.

In the database

In the COA report, the auditors claim to have found 364,036 benefeciaries not in the database entries.

After authenticating, the DSWD confirmed that 107,373 of these beneficiaires are covered under the regular CCT program and are both in the Pantawid Pamilya and the National Household Targetting System (NHTS) databases.

The other 256,663 are under the modified CCT (MCCT).

MCCT households are not under the NHTS, but are considered poor and part of the vulnerable sector. These are street dwellers and indigenouse people. The information of MCCT beneficiaires are stored in a separate database and is open for COA’s viewing.

Innovations

Sec. Soliman also cited the innovations being undertaken by the Department for a more efficient program implementation.

The program has its own dedicated grievance redress mechanism that captures, validates, investigates, and responds to complaints received by the program.

Apart from the text hotline of 09189122813, grievances may be filed through Facebook page “Tanggapan ng Reklamo” and through the Twitter account @4psreklamo.

As of November 2014, the agency, through the Grievance Redress System (GRS), has already delisted a total of 52,657 households since 2009. A total of 232,747 households have been deactivated or are pending for validation from the program. These are households whose accounts have been frozen, mainly because of reports of ineligibility or double entry, while awaiting results of investigation. This is to continuously address complaints on inclusion errors and maintain a clean database of beneficiaries.

“We have also included third party monitoring by involving Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) who are serving as our watchdog as part of our ‘Bantay, Gabay, Tulay and Kaagapay’ framework of partnership with this sector,” Sec. Soliman said.

DSWD also involves the academe, non-government organizations, and the private sector as members of its National Independent Advisory Monitoring Committee (NIAMC) to help in the monitoring of the program.

Investment in the future

Pantawid Pamilya is a human development program of the national government that invests in the health and education of poor households as identified by Listahanan. It utilizes the conditional cash transfer scheme where qualified households receive grants provided they comply with their co-responsibilities such as attendance of children aged 3-18 years old in school; regular health check-ups for children aged 0-5 years or pregnant member of the household, and attendance to the monthly Family Development Sessions.

To date, the program covers 4.4 million households in the 17 regions of the country.

Sec. Soliman also shared that based on the latest result of the impact evaluation, the Pantawid Pamilya is successful in encouraging school attendance, promoting preventive health check-ups and improving maternal health.

“We would like to assure the public that the amount entrusted to our Department goes directly to eligible poor households and that these investments will bear fruit in the years to come. We recognize that there are challenges in program implementation, but we wish to reiterate that these are being responded to accordingly,” Sec. Soliman concluded. ### (Pantawid Pamilya, Social Marketing Unit)

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DSWD launches website dev’t competition

In line with its thrust to involve and empower the youth, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) is holding the ‘Savvy Innovations, Zesty Exchange (SIZE) Matters’ Website Development Contest which will run from August 4 to September 15, 2014.

SIZE Matters is an online showcase of innovative ideas and practices of the DSWD which aims to “reinvent the things we do and the way we do things”.

The competition is open to all freelance professionals, students, and out–of-school youths (OSYs), including youth with disabilities.

Participants may fill out entry forms which can be downloaded at facebook/osm.dswd and osm.dswd.gov.ph. Deadline of submission of entries is on September 15, 2014.

Mechanics of the contest can be viewed also on osm.dswd.gov.ph.

The winning website design will be launched and serve as a platform where one can discuss and develop progressive proposals and practices. The site aims to enhance peer participation and encourage convergence and sharing of ideas.

Once established, the site can evolve into a long-term open platform for mass collaboration to tap knowledge from outside to find solutions to current and emerging demands and challenges of the Department, particularly on good governance and social protection – See more at: https://www.facebook.com/DSWDS.I.Z.E.Matters

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Secretary Soliman with Pantawid Pamilya parent leaders in Ilocos Norte

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DSWD promotes “Agsugpon Tayo” Project to Pantawid Pamilya LGUs

(Upper Photo) Regional Convergence Coordinator Virginia Sesay provides information on the Agsugpon Tayo Project aiming to be replicated by various LGUs with Local Social Welfare Officers and representatives listen.(Lower photo)

(Upper Photo) Regional Convergence Coordinator Virginia Sesay provides information on the Agsugpon Tayo Project aiming to be replicated by various LGUs with Local Social Welfare Officers and representatives listen.(Lower photo)

DSWD FO1 is encouraging Local Government Units (LGUs) to replicate the “Agsugpon Tayo” Project particularly in Pantawid Pamilya Sets 1-3 area especially those with difficult terrains.

In an orientation activity held recently, the “Agsugpon Tayo” Project was explained as a hosting program that provides substitute homes, parental care and guidance to children from upland areas while in school.

This hosting project is a traditional practice in the Municipality of Sugpon, Ilocos Sur and was eventually institutionalized with DSWD to minimize drop-out rate among children and youth in support to Pantawid Pamilya conditions.

Target beneficiaries are children and youth who live in far-flung barangays; currently enrolled in Elementary or high school and; those who have no immediate relative living in the Poblacion.

At present, there are 98 Pantawid Pamilya and Non-Pantawid children-beneficiaries being hosted by 28 Host Families of the said project in Sugpon.

With this project, host families are assessed; strictly meet the requirements and; must agree on the set project rules and procedures before qualifying. Likewise, a “Katulagan” or Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), where clear responsibilities of each party are defined and elaborated, will be both signed by the Host Families and the biological parents. Maximum of four (4) children will be the allowable number of children to be hosted.

For interested LGUs, a Memorandum of Agreement with the Department to implement said project shall be forged.

With the project implementation in Sugpon, there had been positive responses from the community resulting to high enrolment and attendance rates. The children sustained schooling with no untoward incidents while with the host families.

Informed about the project, the Municipality of Burgos, La Union initially signified interest in replicating the Agsugpon Tayo Project.

(by: ALLAN O. LULU, Information Officer II/ Pantawid Pamilya) 

 

 

 

 

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DSWD’s Supplementary Feeding Causes Convergence in Santo Domingo, Ilocos Sur

Day Care Child Kate Salabsab during the Supplementary Feeding Program  in Camestizoan Day Care Center

Day Care Child Kate Salabsab during the Supplementary Feeding Program in Camestizoan Day Care Center

Camestizoan, Sto. Domingo, Ilocos Sur- a community packed with volunteers, responsive Barangay Council, and enthusiast parents continued the Supplementary Feeding  Program (SFP) scheme after its 120-day implementation because of seen good results among the Day Care Children.

Also, the Camestizoan Day Care Center takes pride of its Php 150,000-worth kitchen dedicated to the feeding activities of the Day Care children that was established and funded by the Barangay Council only this year. Accordingly, the children are now more convenient during feeding whether rainy or hot summer days.

 After the 120-day  Supplementary Feeding activity which ended on January 10, 2014, the feeding pursued for at least three times a week with twenty-nine parents’who  provided  counterpart for food in the amount of    Php 20.00 per month, while sponsors were tapped  to cover the food stuff expenses until the classes ends by March 2014.

 More importantly, Day Care Workers, Barangay Nutrition Scholar, Barangay Health Workers and some Pantawid Pamilya Parent Leaders were trained on Parents Effectiveness Service to serve as advocates/trainers on PES where sessions are conducted monthly.

Php 13.00 a Day Boosts A Family Budget

With all the positive comments from the implementers and parents, a  Php 13.00  budget per child a day under the SFP  goes a long way in helping the poor families cope with their tight budget.

 According to Head Social Worker Fe Valencia, most of the parents are no longer giving extra allowance to their Day Care children and at  the same time healthy food served is assured.  “Pakalag-anan dagiti parents daytoy a programa (The SFP feeding eases the burden of giving allowance to the children), Valencia further said.  This also means extra savings for the poor families  (Php 286.00 a month).

Severely Nourished Child Turns Healthy

Of the 740 Day Care Children in Sto. Domingo, Ilocos Sur, there are 78 (severely underweight and underweight) prior to the SFP implementation. After 120 days feeding, only 30 children are now underweight.

Weight increases with increased consumption on vegetable and other nutritious viand among the SFP beneficiaries. Day Care child Kate Salabsab who used to weigh 9.5 kilograms now weighs 11.3 kilograms after 6 months.

Kate’s mother revealed that she used to eat just plain soup of any viand and rice which led her to be severely underweight. .

With the SFP Kate is encouraged to eat healthy food along with her classmates. Aside from this, she now practices healthy habits such as washing hands regularly before eating and saying-no to ‘junk foods and soft drinks. Her mother Jonalyn is very thankful of the SFP. (by: Iryn D. Cubangbang, Regl. Information Officer)

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DSWD-assisted-Php 11.7 M Bottom-Up Budgeting Projects Gain LGUs counterpart

Otherwise known as Grassroots Participatory Budgeting Process (GPBP), this Bottom-Up Budgeting (BUB) was introduced in Region 1 and has claimed approval among the community folks, LGU counterparts and government agencies to include DSWD with its goal of inclusive development among poor communities.

 From the project name alone, people from community were involved in several processes which led to identification of community projects funded by the Government of the Philippines (GOP).

For CY 2013, Php 11.7 million worth of funded community projects were assisted by DSWD following the scheme of BUB in La Union particularly in Aringay, Bagulin, Bangar, Caba, Luna, Rosario, Tubao, and San Fernando City.

 To ensure completion of projects, Convergence Strategy and Community Driven Development Projects Regional Coordinator Virginia P. Sesay reiterated during check distribution in Bagulin, La Union  that funds come in tranches (50-40-10%), with at least 70% liquidation, downloading of succeeding funds come after.

 With BUB, DSWD Regional Director Marcelo Nicomdes J. Castillo believes that good governance and   empowered voices of communities are cultivated among those who took part in the social preparation activities.

 Farthest Barangay in Bagulin, La Union reached

 It takes a 5-hour walk and 5 times crossing of a river to reach barangay Tio-angan. Even this far, this community will soon establish a Senior Citizen’s Center as its identified BUB  project. This, according to Alenso Talban,  is giving prime to the contribution of elderly in local governance and recognizing their efforts in maintaining peace and security among families and communities.

 Also, a Training Center and a Day Care Center will be established in barangay Suyo and Wallayan, respectively under the BUB.

 It can be noted that Bagulin has no existing training facility yet, of which with the BUB project, more trainings will be conducted by private and public institutions, thus, increasing job placement among out-of-school youth and women, Ernesto Estira, a BUB committee member said.

 For the 3 projects funded, LGU-Bagulin gave Php 300,000.00 as cash counterpart.

 Co-Ownership of Community Projects

 In  Tio-angan, the Senior Citizens Center of BUB will  also serve as an evacuation center and eventually a multi-purpose center since the barangay has limited facilities that will cater to its social activities.

 The value for government projects is felt among the community folks.  “Daytoy a proyekto mangted iti challenge kadagiti ub-ubbing a saluadan da  dagitoy kastoy a tulong tapno addan to manen dumateng a tulong manipud iti gobierno (This project serves as a challenge among the young to also preserve and give importance so that government help will again  be given  in the community)”.

 No more wandering VAWC victims in Rosario, La Union

 Immediate shelter and protection of women and children who are victims of abuse is the main goal of the BUB project in this town with the establishment of a VAWC Center. The town of Rosario has assisted at least 24 VAWC (violence against women and their children) cases in 2012 where the victims were temporarily sheltered among their relatives and/ or barangay officials.

 More importantly, a local cash counterpart of Php 300,000.00 is added to the BUB funds of the same amount. As mentioned by Local Head Social Worker Grenaflor Magsakay, the LGU will again provide an additional                     Php 300,000 to complete the needed furnishing of the VAWC Center. (by: Iryn D. Cubangbang, Regl. Information Officer)

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DSWD-assisted-Php 11.7 M Bottom-Up Budgeting Projects Gain LGUs counterpart

The BUB Project in Rosario, La Union while being monitored by Dir. Marcelo Nicomedes Castillo with  Regl. Proj. Coordinator Virginia P. Sesay  and Head Social

The BUB Project in Rosario, La Union while being monitored by Dir. Marcelo Nicomedes Castillo with Regl. Proj. Coordinator Virginia P. Sesay and Head Social

Otherwise known as Grassroots Participatory Budgeting Process (GPBP), this Bottom-Up Budgeting (BUB) was introduced in Region 1 and has claimed approval among the community folks, LGU counterparts and government agencies to include DSWD with its goal of inclusive development among poor communities.

 From the project name alone, people from community were involved in several processes which led to identification of community projects funded by the Government of the Philippines (GOP).

For CY 2013, Php 11.7 million worth of funded community projects were assisted by DSWD following the scheme of BUB in La Union particularly in Aringay, Bagulin, Bangar, Caba, Luna, Rosario, Tubao, and San Fernando City.

 To ensure completion of projects, Convergence Strategy and Community Driven Development Projects Regional Coordinator Virginia P. Sesay reiterated during check distribution in Bagulin, La Union  that funds come in tranches (50-40-10%), with at least 70% liquidation, downloading of succeeding funds come after.

 With BUB, DSWD Regional Director Marcelo Nicomdes J. Castillo believes that good governance and   empowered voices of communities are cultivated among those who took part in the social preparation activities.

 Farthest Barangay in Bagulin, La Union reached

 It takes a 5-hour walk and 5 times crossing of a river to reach barangay Tio-angan. Even this far, this community will soon establish a Senior Citizen’s Center as its identified BUB  project. This, according to Alenso Talban,  is giving prime to the contribution of elderly in local governance and recognizing their efforts in maintaining peace and security among families and communities.

 Also, a Training Center and a Day Care Center will be established in barangay Suyo and Wallayan, respectively under the BUB.

 It can be noted that Bagulin has no existing training facility yet, of which with the BUB project, more trainings will be conducted by private and public institutions, thus, increasing job placement among out-of-school youth and women, Ernesto Estira, a BUB committee member said.

 For the 3 projects funded, LGU-Bagulin gave Php 300,000.00 as cash counterpart.

 Co-Ownership of Community Projects

 In  Tio-angan, the Senior Citizens Center of BUB will  also serve as an evacuation center and eventually a multi-purpose center since the barangay has limited facilities that will cater to its social activities.

 The value for government projects is felt among the community folks.  “Daytoy a proyekto mangted iti challenge kadagiti ub-ubbing a saluadan da  dagitoy kastoy a tulong tapno addan to manen dumateng a tulong manipud iti gobierno (This project serves as a challenge among the young to also preserve and give importance so that government help will again  be given  in the community)”.

 No more wandering VAWC victims in Rosario, La Union

 Immediate shelter and protection of women and children who are victims of abuse is the main goal of the BUB project in this town with the establishment of a VAWC Center. The town of Rosario has assisted at least 24 VAWC (violence against women and their children) cases in 2012 where the victims were temporarily sheltered among their relatives and/ or barangay officials.

 More importantly, a local cash counterpart of Php 300,000.00 is added to the BUB funds of the same amount. As mentioned by Local Head Social Worker Grenaflor Magsakay, the LGU will again provide an additional                     Php 300,000 to complete the needed furnishing of the VAWC Center. (by: Iryn D. Cubangbang, Regl. Information Officer)

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DSWD clarifies non-existent beneficiaries; unliqidated accounts

With the region’s 188,035 Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries, DSWD-FO1 Regional Director Marcelo Nicomedes J. Castillo disclosed that there are no cases of non – existing beneficiaries in the region.

This is in response with surfacing issues on Pantawid Pamilya relative to the Commission on Audit (COA) 2012 Consolidated Audit Report.

DSWD Central Office clarified that it has responded to the issue and has already accounted the 7,782 household beneficiaries allegedly missing from the list of validated and registered beneficiaries.

Accordingly, the 7,762 beneficiaries were on the list upon double checking the list of the National Household Targeting System for Poverty Reduction(NHTS-PR). The remaining 20 were part of the data that were corrupted. These alleged non-existing beneficiaries were from Regions 3, 4A, 4B, 5, 7 and 11.

For the unliquidated accounts, DSWD clarified that as of December 2012, the total unliquidated balance from the cash grants is P3.18 billion, of which only P1.38 billion remains unliquidated as of Dec. 31, 2013.

DSWD explained that the process of liquidation requires submission of cash-pay-out documentation from Landbank and will be a continuing activity as long as there are payouts.

Also, staff are prompt at gathering necessary documents for the proper and immediate liquidation of beneficiaries’ cash grants.

Pantawid Pamilya is a conditional cash transfer program of the Philippine government which invests in human capital through health and education by providing cash grants to extremely poor households with children ages 0 – 14 years old

by: Allan O. Lulu / Information Officer II, Pantawid Pamilya

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