Fighting EGGStreme poverty, gaining EGGStra income

Members of the Green Guava SLP Association offer freshly harvested eggs.

Most of the Pantawid Pamilya women at Brgy. Baybayabas, Santiago, Ilocos Sur help their husbands earn a living by working as seasonal farm workers and part-time housekeeper, while others stay at home to look after the family. Aspiring to gain extra income, 23 of these women organized themselves as Green Guava Sustainable Livelihood (SLP) Association and sought assistance from the Department of Social Welfare and Development Field Office 1 through its Sustainable Livelihood Program by proposing an egg-layering business.

Daytoy ti napilimi ta nalaklaka laeng nga ipataray gapo ta amin ket agkasapulan ti itlog, iso ti kadawyan a pammigat (We chose this livelihood because of its high demand. Everyone buys eggs, it is usually serve for breakfast),” said Flora Quiñones, the Association President.

The association underwent a 3-day Skills Training on Chicken Egg Layering in June 2018 where they were given 220 heads of ready-to-lay chickens, one year supply of feeds, vitamins, one sprayer, and 12 waterers as starter kits for their business. Each of the members contributed materials and worked together in the construction of their poultry.

Members are scheduled to look after the poultry’s needs and attend to their customers’ orders. The association can harvest a daily average of four to five trays of which a tray is sold at PhP140.00 to PhP150.00 depending on its size. People in the neighborhood and those with sari-sari stores in the adjacent barangays are their regular buyers. Sixty percent of the profit is divided equally among the members every month while 40 percent is automatically deposited to the Association’s savings account. “Adda PhP52,000.00 a savings min. Balbalakenmi daytoy nga igatangan iti kanayonan a manok tapno umado pay ti maapitmi nga itlog ken dumakkel ti kitami (We have PhP52,000.00 savings in the bank. We are planning to purchase additional egg-laying chickens to increase our harvest, thus growth in our income),’’ said Flora.

Flora supplements her family’s income by working as an on-call laundrywoman who makes a PhP900.00 weekly income. His husband is a seasonal farm tenant, two of his children are construction workers, while her youngest child is in high school. “Pasaray adda madibidendok a lima gasut inggana pito gasut ti maysa bulan ket di mayaten. Syempre pagrugrugyanan mi pay laeng met, iso nga alagaan mi daytoy inted ti SLP tapno rumang-ay met ti biagmi uray kaskasano.(Receiving  PhP500.00 to PhP600.00 monthly dividend share from the poultry is a great help. We are still growing this SLP-assisted business. We shall nurture this livelihood with hopes of achieving a better quality of life),” she added.

SLP is a capability-building program of the DSWD that provides access to opportunities that increase the productivity of the livelihood assets of the poor, vulnerable, and marginalized communities in order to improve their socio-economic wellbeing. (by: Janine Joy B. Altero, Social Marketing Officer, Sustainable Livelihood Program)

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Women of Bolinao weaves good income through buri bag making

The Buri Crafters Association of Bolinao, an all-women group organized by a common goal, religiously weaves buri bags every day to help their husbands augment their families’ daily needs. “Masaya ang aming mga asawa dahil kahit papaano ay nakakatulong kami sa mga gastusin sa bahay. Dati ay umaasa lang kami sa kita nila (Our husbands are happy that we supplement their income. We only depend on their income before),” said Ermelita R. Caasi, the Association President.

The 50 members used to do the business individually prior to the intervention of the Department of Social Welfare and Development Field Office 1 through its Self-Employment Assistance Kaunlaran (SEA-K) scheme in 2015. The Association was able to avail PhP70,000.00 from the BUB GAA 2014 fund of the DSWD FO 1.

Although most of their materials are bought in the market, their barangay is blessed to have Buri plants growing wild in their backyards. Responsible livelihood it is, the members only collect and process the Buri leaves into buri strips once they reach their maturity (when the tree is at least 8 meters high).

The bags are meticulously hand-woven by these housewives to ensure uniqueness and durability. With an established market, these are sold in retail at the local market, and in bulk at Divisoria in Manila. Not only that they are earning, the Association members contribute to the preservation of traditional weaving practice in the Ilocos Region.

Each member can earn a net income of PhP200.00 to PhP1,000.00 weekly depending on the number of bags produced. “Hindi ko kailangang mamili sa pagiging housewife o paghahabi kasi kaya ko namang pagsabayin (I don’t need to choose between being a housewife and a sewer. It is convenient that I can do both at the same time),” said Margie G. Casta, the Association Secretary. “Minsan naghahabi ako habang hinihintay kong maluto yung kanin (Sometimes, I weave while I wait for the rice to be cooked),” she shared.

As an association, each member is required to save PhP50.00 monthly to the group. Some of the accumulated savings were later utilized as an emergency fund where a member can loan a maximum of PhP3,000.00 per cycle with five percent monthly interest.

Just as a single Buri strip beautifully weaved into bags, the members – in grateful appreciation to the DSWD’s intervention – realized that working together as an association sharing ideas and knowledge is way more effective than working alone. (by: Janine Joy B. Altero, Social Marketing Officer, Sustainable Livelihood Program)

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Women of Bolinao weaves good income through buri bag making

Bonding through weaving. Members of the Buri Crafters Association of Bolinao meet and weave together at least once every two months to catch up on each other.

The Buri Crafters Association of Bolinao, an all-women group organized by a common goal, religiously weaves buri bags every day to help their husbands augment their families’ daily needs.

Masaya ang aming mga asawa dahil kahit papaano ay nakakatulong kami sa mga gastusin sa bahay. Dati ay umaasa lang kami sa kita nila (Our husbands are happy that we supplement their income. We only depend on their income before),” said Ermelita R. Caasi, the Association President. 

The 50 members used to do the business individually prior to the intervention of the Department of Social Welfare and Development Field Office 1 through its Self-Employment Assistance Kaunlaran (SEA-K) scheme in 2015. The Association was able to avail PhP70,000.00 from the BUB GAA 2014 fund of the DSWD FO 1.

Although most of their materials are bought in the market, their barangay is blessed to have Buri plants growing wild in their backyards. Responsible livelihood it is, the members only collect and process the Buri leaves into buri strips once they reach their maturity (when the tree is at least 8 meters high).

The bags are meticulously hand-woven by these housewives to ensure uniqueness and durability. With an established market, these are sold in retail at the local market, and in bulk at Divisoria in Manila. Not only that they are earning, the Association members contribute to the preservation of traditional weaving practice in the Ilocos Region.

Each member can earn a net income of PhP200.00 to PhP1,000.00 weekly depending on the number of bags produced. “Hindi ko kailangang mamili sa pagiging housewife o paghahabi kasi kaya ko namang pagsabayin (I don’t need to choose between being a housewife and a sewer. It is convenient that I can do both at the same time),” said Margie G. Casta, the Association Secretary. “Minsan naghahabi ako habang hinihintay kong maluto yung kanin (Sometimes, I weave while I wait for the rice to be cooked),” she shared.

As an association, each member is required to save PhP50.00 monthly to the group. Some of the accumulated savings were later utilized as an emergency fund where a member can loan a maximum of PhP3,000.00 per cycle with five percent monthly interest.

Just as a single Buri strip beautifully weaved into bags, the members – in grateful appreciation to the DSWD’s intervention – realized that working together as an association sharing ideas and knowledge is way more effective than working alone. (by: Janine Joy B. Altero, Social Marketing Officer, Sustainable Livelihood Program)

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DSWD FO 1 supports DepEd’s Happy School Movement, Brigada Eskwela

Unified by a common goal of securing good quality education and well-being for the Filipino children, the Department of Social Welfare and Development Field Office 1 showed its support to the Department of Education’s Happy School Movement (HSM) and Brigada Eskwela 2019 that kick-off recently in Vigan City, Ilocos Sur.

With the theme “Paaralang Masayang Maglingkod, Tagumpay ng Bata’y Itataguyod”, the HSM is an advocacy that envisions having a generation of responsive and cross-culture competent future builders through creating a happier and more positive school atmosphere. The DepEd acknowledges the engagement of external stakeholders like the DSWD in the effective and transparent school governance that leads to happy school environment among learners and teachers.

Relative to this, the DSWD has its own fair share to the HSM’s advocacy through its Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program that provides cash grants to poor households, primarily of children aged 0-18 years old. With the conditionalities of the program being met by the beneficiaries in order to receive the program packages, a child has a positive learning attitude in school. Ultimately, he and the rest of the family are guided to become responsible citizens of the community.

The Brigada Eskwela as an annual National Maintenance Week in all public elementary and high schools aims to inculcate volunteerism efforts and active citizenship among the community players to make the schools more conducive for learning. Scheduled on 20 – 25 May 2019, thousands of Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries and some DSWD staff in Region 1 work hand in hand in the cleaning, repairing, repainting and other maintenance activities of the schools.

The kick-off activity also served as an Information Caravan venue for DSWD staff who distributed flyers of the DSWD programs and services to the participants. (by: Janine Joy B. Altero, Social Marketing Officer, Sustainable Livelihood Program)

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Wellness services provide good income to housewives of San Carlos City, Pangasinan

 “Nanmaliw ya dalan su DSWD-SLP onpian makala kami na NC II ed panagmasahe tan makaanap na regular ya trabaho (The Department of Social Welfare and Development Field Office 1 through its Sustainable Livelihood Program helped me secure a National Certificate II (NC II) in massage therapy and find a regular job).”

From a homemaker to becoming the family’s breadwinner, Gina T. Navarro of Brgy. Isla, San Carlos City, Pangasinan provides for the needs of her family by rendering massage therapy  and beauty care services in one of the resorts in the City. Her husband needs to stay at home to recover from a head injury sustained from a car accident in 2017.

In 2017, Gina was among the 40 DSWD-SLP served participants in San Carlos City who underwent a skills training conducted by Maxima Technical and Skills Training Institute, Inc. and received NC II in Beauty Therapy and Straightening with Entrepreneurship from the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) in the same year.

Just in time when a resort is in need of wellness staff a month after receiving their NC II, the DSWD-SLP endorsed its served participants where six (6) of them were successfully hired. The resort later shouldered the training and securing of NC II on Beauty Care to expand their knowledge and skills in manicure, pedicure, and foot spa.

Bukod ed komisyon mi ya PhP80.00 kada sakey oras ya panmamasahe, iitdan da kami ni na PhP100.00 ya allowance kada agew. (Aside from the PhP80.00 commission for every one hour massage, we are entitled to a PhP100.00 daily allowance),” shared Gina. She earns an average of PhP340.00 to PhP700.00 a day depending on the demand. Her clients often give her tip for her excellent service. To maximize productivity during her day-off, she renders home service massage.

Some of her batchmates prefer to use their skills as their part-time income opportunity as they need to attend to their family. They do on-call home massage and hair treatment services during their free time to augment their family income.

Ag mo pupulyanan ya nu anto ka natan et umman ka la. Awaten mo may pagkakataon tan mantiwala ka ya kayam su manmaliw a maruong ed apilem ya trabaho. Napan-aralan met ya amin (Do not allow yourself to be stuck at where you are. Grab opportunities and believe that you can be good at your chosen craft. Everything can be learned, anyway),” she added. (by: Janine Joy B. Altero, Social Marketing Officer, Sustainable Livelihood Program)

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DSWD-SLP supports shell souvenir making in Bolinao, Pangasinan

Known for its white beaches, enchanting caves, and breath-taking waterfalls, the town of Bolinao in Pangasinan never fails to wow local and foreign travellers. As a way to remember the beauty of the town, one must take home the best souvenir in town there is — seashell crafts.

The seashell souvenirs as products of the creative hands of the Bolinaos come in many lovely designs — chandeliers, wind chimes, Christmas lanterns, key chains, and bags, among others.

The high income potential of seashell souvenir making encouraged 10 Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program beneficiaries in Brgy. Balingasay to seek livelihood assistance from the Department of Social Welfare and Development Field Office 1 through its Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP) in 2015.

On the same year, the members were organized into Balingasay Women’s SLP Association receiving a seed capital fund of PhP10,000.00 each from DSWD GAA 2015 fund.

Gemma Gamueda, the Association President, said that she makes the souvenirs during her rest time from doing household chores, usually in the afternoon or at night while watching her favorite telenovelas. “Matrabaho ang paggawa pero nakasanayan na namin (It requires a lot of processes, but we are used to it),” she shared.

The members usually need an hour walk to the shore to glean sacks of free seashells or buy them at PhP60.00 to PhP75.00 per big can. These are dried up under the sun for a day or two. After which, the shells are cooked with chlorine for about five minutes in a big wok to attain their white color while making the shells more durable. These will be dried up under the sun again for a day. Some are dyed with colors for aesthetic purposes prior to designing.

The small lanterns are sold at PhP10.00 to P35.00 per piece while the prices of the chandeliers range from PhP60.00 to PhP250.00 depending on the size and design. Businessmen buy products from the association and sell them in retail in pasalubong centers and hotels in town while others are sold by bulk in Divisoria in Manila. During off-peak season, each member earns PhP1,200.00 monthly while during “Ber” months where Christmas lanterns are in demand, each member can earn as much as PhP4,000.00 to PhP5,000 monthly.

Minimum wage earners ang mga asawa namin kaya malaking tulong ang kita namin dito. Masaya kami na umaabot sa iba’t ibang lugar ang aming mga gawang-kamay at nakakatulong kami sa turismo ng Bolinao (Our profits greatly augment the minimum wage of our husbands. We are happy that our handmade products have reached many places and we are helping the tourism industry of Bolinao),” said Gemma.  (by: Janine Joy B. Altero, Social Marketing Officer, Sustainable Livelihood Program)

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Real beauty never fades

Old age may have drawn wrinkles on her face, removed her eyesight, and weaken her body but her sanguinity remains through the years. She loves to be groomed beautifully by her daughters with some face powder and lipstick on her face, and some fancy jewelries to complete her daily look.

Her beauty radiates not only from the outside but can also be mirrored through her jolly personality. This is the 105-year old lola Emilia Viloria Cabotaje from Brgy. Aquib, Narvacan, Ilocos Sur who often cracks jokes and sings funny Iluko melodies. Don’t start a debate of who is more good-looking, because she will insist that she is the most beautiful of all. Ask if she can eat “bagnet”, she says that she is just waiting for her teeth to grow before she can taste one of her town’s most delectable dishes.

Embracing life together. Lola Emilia’s daughters promise to take care of her until God permits.

Ni nanangmi ti liwliwami. Makapaalis ti kinaragsak na iso nga talaga nga al-alagaanmi  (Our mother is our stress-reliever. Her cheerfulness is contagious that is why we really take good care of her),” said her 74-year old spinster daughter Lola Emerencia. They live in their old family house together with 78-year old Lola Rosalina, also lola Emilia’s daughter.

Reminiscing the past, life was not beautiful as it may seem. Her childhood was spent in the fields helping his father earn a living because her mother died at a very young age. Later, she was married to a poor farm tenant of whom they were blessed with six children. “Narigat ti biag ngem iso ti nakem ni Apo (life is hard but that is God’s will)”, said the old woman still in her smiles. She believed that her blindness was caused by prolonged and extreme exposure to the sun.

The centenarian cash gift she received was deposited in the bank for future use. Lola Emilia and Lola Rosalina are DSWD social pensioners while Lola Emerencia is a private pensioner. Their combined monthly stipends are used in buying their daily needs, and Lola Emilia’s diapers, and vitamins. They believe that her soft skin is the product of drinking three glasses of milk daily. She used to smoke native tabacco and drink “shoktong”, a local wine for the old back then.

Despite her daughter’s unconditional love and untiring care for her, lola Emilia’s prayer is for her eternal peace to be granted the soonest so her daughters can rest from all the burden she is causing them. “Agyamanak kenni Apo ta nadanon ko daytoy a paset ti biag kon, mabalin ko aginanan (I thank God for allowing me to reach this age, I can now rest)”, she added. But for her daughters’ love for her, they are willing to endure all the hardship as long as they are intact and together. (by: Janine Joy B. Altero, Social Marketing Officer, Sustainable Livelihood Program)

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DSWD-SLP supports dried fish producers in San Fabian, Pangasinan

Most of the barangay folks of Nibaliw Navarte in San Fabian, Pangasinan rely on fishing and dried fish (daing) production as their viable livelihood. However, due to limited financial capital, the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program beneficiaries are engaged in debt cycle from loan sharks.

To address this issue, 21 Pantawid Pamilya beneficiaries were organized as The Delicious Dried Fish SLP Association by the Department of Social Welfare and Development Field Office 1 through its Sustainable Livelihood Program. After being accredited by DSWD as a Civil Society Organization, the Association received PhP302,000.00 Seed Capital Fund (SCF) in February 2019 to augment their existing resources.

Part of the SCF was utilized in purchasing starter skits such as banyeras (fish tub), bilaran (a rectangular frame with net), sacks of salt, and other fish drying tools.

At present, the Association hires a freezer truck to transport an average of 1,000 kilos of various fish species from Malabon City to San Fabian at least twice a week. The processing of dried fish takes place immediately to ensure the products’ high quality.

The fishes are dried up in the barangay’s vacant lot while the finished products are stored at the association president’s small daing storage facility.

At times when the members are free from their usual livelihood engagements outside the association, they help in the dried fish production and enable an additional earning of PhP3,000.00 for working at least 8 days a month for the Association’s business. Apart from this, the Association also earns an average of PhP10,000.00 to PhP15,000.00 weekly of which they unanimously agreed to be saved in a bank for future use.

The finished products are being delivered to Bugallon and Lingayen, Pangasinan; Agoo, La Union; and Baguio City. Some wholesalers and retailers directly go to the production area to buy.

Nagpapasalamat kami sa DSWD-SLP dahil natulungan kaming pahalagahan ang tunay na diwa ng pagkakaisa, kooperasyon, at hardwork. Hindi na namin kailangang problemahin kung saan ulit mangungutang  ng puhunan (We thank the DSWD-SLP for helping us realize the true importance of unity, cooperation, and hardwork. We no longer worry where to loan capital.),” said Eleyna Ceynas, SLP Association President.

The Association projects to purchase an electric drying machine to be used during rainy season.

The Cayanga Dried Fish SLP Association and the TG Rain or Shine SLP Association in San Fabian engaged in dried fish production are DSWD-SLP assisted associations as well that received a Seed Capital Fund of PhP329,925.00 and PhP420,000.00, respectively. (by: Janine Joy B. Altero, Social Marketing Officer, Sustainable Livelihood Program)

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